Photographing Historical Sites in Wales Tintern Abbey

Photographing Tintern Abbey in South Wales always presents a different challenge and opportunity.  The first stones were laid in 1131 and the sheer scale of the abbey remnants is breathtaking. Tintern Abbey-35

When taking photographs in November, the main challenge faced by any photographer is the light.  The tree-covered mountains either side of the River Wye rise up steeply and shade is cast upon the whole area pretty early in the afternoon.  For this particular photoshoot, I didn’t arrive until around 1pm and the sun was already quite low in the sky.  One whole side of the building was shielded in shadows cast by the sun sitting in the cloudless sky.  With the help of a little bit of post photoshoot processing I was able to use this difficult light to try and produce something slightly different.

Tintern Abbey, managed by Cadw, is one of the best-known monastic sites in the British Isles.  Even though many parts of the original building have disappeared, the remaining arches, windows and pillars are exceptionally well preserved.

The Abbey is in the shape of a cross and the main walls on all four ends remain and stretch high up into the sky.  The detail is phenomenal and I would have loved to have seen those windows filled with stained glass.Tintern Abbey-6346

Despite the blue sky, the temperature was really cold and you could only imagine how life would have been for the monks living and worshiping at the Abbey.  There is much still unknown.  Tintern Abbey was the first Cistercian monastery to be established in Wales, only abandoning the abbey 400 years later in 1536 during their suppression by Henry VIII and Thomas Cromwell.

The photographs can be seen on my website and were all taken using my Canon 6D.  There was enough light to use F22 and these were all taken handheld.  In Lightroom I have made some adjustments to enhance the brickwork and reduce shadow.

Whether you are a photographer or not, I highly recommend visiting Tintern Abbey.  It is one of the most amazing historical buildings in the UK and just gives a little insight into our religious past.

Paul Fears is a commercial and industrial photographer based in South Wales.  All photographs of Tintern Abbey and other historical sites are available as downloads, prints, posters, canvas or framed.  For further information either visit the website or contact Paul on paul@paulfearsphoto.co.uk

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Castles In Wales – Caldicot Castle

The gatehouse of Caldicot Castle in Monmouthshire, South Wales

The gatehouse of Caldicot Castle in Monmouthshire, South Wales

This blog on Caldicot Castle is the first in a series on photographing Castles in Wales.  Photographing castles is one of my passions and being located just outside Pontypridd in South Wales means that many of them are not that far away.

Caldicot Castle is a wonderfully preserved example of a medieval castle located just outside Caldicot in Monmouthshire, UK.  The castle dates back to 1158 when Humphrey de Bohun III, Earl of Hereford was passed the manor of Caldicot and built the stone keep and curtain walls of the present-day castle.  Further details on the castle can be found on the Caldicot Castle website.

The castle is great to photograph, especially as you can walk around the entire perimeter.  Walking up to the front gatehouse through the trees is a treat, especially with the colours of Autumn.

The photographs in this collection just focuses on external views of the Castle and can be seen on the Paul Fears Photography website.

Photographs of Monmouthshire’s Three Castles

There are three wonderful castles to visit in Monmouthshire, Wales; Grosmont, Skenfrith and White Castle. Grosmont and Skenfrith are positioned near the River Wye, whilst White Castle is further to the west. All have origins that date back to the 1200’s although they were modified and extended extensively over time.Grosmont Castle

Grosmont is located up a short hill behind the town of Grosmont. It has a spectacular chimney, which stands proud at the back of the castle. When we were there, there was a boy and his father playing football in the grounds, which was lovely. The views from the upper levels are amazing.

Skenfrith is dominated by the central tower, which stands proud in the centre of the castle. As you stand in the grounds, you look up to see the tall hills and I could only wonder what it must have felt like to see your enemies approaching from afar.

Skenfrith CastleWhite Castle is the biggest of the three, with quite extensive grounds. The inner ward is protected by a twin-towered gatehouse and is surrounded by a small moat.

All three are well worth a visit. I have posted my photographs on http://www.paulfearsphoto.co.uk/index.php?cat=photographs&id=16&album=Castles and this weekend I will be displaying framed and mounted copies at a big event outside and inside Caerphilly Castle called The Big Cheese.White Castle